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Aluminum titanate ceramics

Aluminum titanate is a ceramic material consisting of a mixture of alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) forming solid solution with stoichiometric proportion of the components: Al2O3*TiO2 or Al2TiO5.

Aluminium titanate is prepared by heating of a mixture of alumina and titania at temperature above 2460°F (1350°C).

The powder is then sintered at a temperature in the range 2550 - 2910°F (1400 - 1600°C) in air atmosphere.

Pure Aluminum Titanate is unstable at the temperatures above 1380°F (750°C) when the solid solution decomposes into two separate phases Al2O3 and TiO2. Aluminum Titanate ceramics are doped with MgO, SiO2 and ZrO2in order to stabilize the solid solution structure.

The distinctive property of Aluminum Titanate ceramics is their high thermal shock resistance which is a result of very low coefficient of thermal expansion.

The following characteristics are typical for Aluminum Titanate Ceramics:

  • Low coefficient of thermal expansion;
  • High Thermal Shock Resistance;
  • Low Thermal Conductivity;
  • Low wettability in molten non-ferrous metals;
  • Good chemical resistance;
  • Good wear resistance.

Disadvantage of Aluminum Titanate ceramics is relatively low mechanical strength caused by micro-cracks formed as a result of anisotropy of thermal expansion along the three primary axes of the crystal lattice (a single crystal of Aluminum Titanate expands along two axes and contract along the third axis when heated).

Aluminum Titanate ceramic materials ceramics are used for manufacturing crucibles, launders, nozzles, riser tubes, pouring spouts and thermocouples for non-ferrous metallurgy, portliner and cylinder linerrs in automotive engines, master moulds in the glass industry, spacing rings of catalytic converters.

Properties of some aluminum titanate ceramics

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aluminum_titanate_ceramics.txt · Last modified: 2012/11/03 by dmitri_kopeliovich
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